Pre-prohibition Drinks of the Week [No. 4]

Pre-prohibition Drinks of the Week [No. 4]

By Andrew “the Alchemist”

Sunday, October 10, 2010

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It’s Sunday, and time for another edition of the Pre-prohibition Drinks of the Week!  I wanted to make this an all George Kappeler edition, but no drink fitting the succulent genre is found in his book.  That genre seems to have emerged just before prohibition.

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Pre-prohibition Ensemble of the Week:

BRANDY CHAMPARELLE (á la Kappeler)

Vessel: 2 fl-oz. stemmed cordial goblet

Build in separate layers in the vessel:

→ ¼ fl-oz. maraschino liqueur

→ ¼ fl-oz. premium traditional Curaçao liqueur (creole shrubb is the best modern analog)

→ ¼ fl-oz. yellow Chartreuse™ liqueur

→ ¼ fl-oz. brandy of choice (Cognac brandy is recommended)

Garnish with a few drops of Angostura™ aromatic additive bitters

Enjoy!

From: Modern American Drinks – by George Kappeler (1895)

Note: only the lack of dilution keeps this drink from being a bittered sling (a.k.a. cocktail).

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Pre-prohibition Sling of the Week:

DUNDORADO COCKTAIL

Vessel: 4½ fl-oz. glass cocktail goblet

Combine in a mixing glass:

→ 1 fl-oz. old tom gin

→ 1 fl-oz. premium sweet vermouth

→ 1 bsp. Calisaya™ grand bitters

→ method ice

Stir for just under two minutes to mix, chill and dilute

Strain into the vessel

Garnish by twisting a strip of lemon zest over the drink and then dropping it in

Enjoy!

From: Modern American Drinks – by George Kappeler (1895)

Note: Calisaya™ was used in American drinks before prohibition, but has not been available for a long time.  It is now being made again in Oregon according to an original Italian formula from the 1800’s.  It is only available in Oregon at the present time.  It is fortunate that I was in Oregon recently.

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Pre-prohibition Posset of the Week:

BALTIMORE EGGNOG

Vessel: 10½ fl-oz. glass banquet goblet (chilled)

Combine in a mixing tin:

→ 1 fl-oz. verdelho Madeira wine

→ ½ fl-oz. brandy of choice (Cognac brandy is recommended)

→ ½ fl-oz. pot-still Jamaica rum (Smith & Cross™ is recommended)

→ 1 pinch. powdered cinnamon

→ 1 tbsp. superfine sugar

→ 1 whole ‘large’ egg {without the shell}

→ 1 fl-oz. heavy cream

→ plenty of method ice

Cover with half-tin and shake vigorously for at least fifteen seconds to mix, chill, dilute and aerate

Finely-strain into the vessel

Garnish with an freshly-grated nutmeg

Enjoy!

From: Modern American Drinks – by George Kappeler (1895)

Note: I have modified the recipe by using a specific amount of heavy cream instead of a vague amount of whole milk

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Pre-prohibition Punch of the Week:

KNICKERBOCKER SOUR

Vessel: 5½ fl-oz. glass sour goblet (chilled)

Combine in a mixing tin:

→ 1¾ fl-oz. pot-still Jamaica rum (Smith & Cross™ is recommended)

→ ¼ fl-oz. premium traditional Curaçao liqueur (creole shrubb is the best modern analog)

→ 1 fl-oz. freshly-pressed Eureka lemon juice

→ 1 dsp. superfine sugar

→ ¼ fl-oz. pineapple syrup

→ plenty of method ice

Cover with half-tin and shake vigorously for at least twenty seconds to mix, chill, dilute and aerate

Finely-strain into the vessel

Garnish with an authentic maraschino cherry on a skewer

Enjoy!

From: Modern American Drinks – by George Kappeler (1895)

Note: Kappeler calls this the Knickerbocker Punch, but since he serves it without ice and does not add any water or other fluid weak ingredient, I will call it a sour.

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Pre-prohibition Grog of the Week:

SOUTHERN COOLER

Vessel: 13½ fl-oz. tall glass tumbler

→ entire paring of Eureka lemon peel (artfully spiraled up entire tumbler)

Insert straw

→ 5 fl-oz. service ice (5 full-ounce cubes)

Build in the vessel:

→ 1 fl-oz. Bourbon whiskey

→ 1 fl-oz. pot-still Jamaica rum (Smith & Cross™ is recommended)

→ ¼ fl-oz. simple 1:1 sugar syrup

→ 6 fl-oz. plain soda

Enjoy!

From: Modern American Drinks – by George Kappeler (1895)

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Pre-prohibition Succulent of the Week:

ORANGE BLOSSOM (á la Waldorf-Astoria)

Vessel: 5 fl-oz. glass wine goblet (chilled)

Combine in a mixing tin:

→ 1 fl-oz. old tom gin

→ 1 fl-oz. premium sweet vermouth

→ 1 fl-oz. freshly-pressed orange juice (Valencia or navel)

→ plenty of method ice

Cover with half-tin and shake vigorously for at least twenty seconds to mix, chill, dilute and aerate

Finely-strain into the vessel

Garnish with a quarter-wheel slice of orange

Enjoy!

From: The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book – by Albert Stevens Crockett (1935)

{This drink is from the main layer of material in Crockett’s book, which he states came from the original recipe book in his possession that had been used in the hotel’s bar until it closed in 1919.}

Note: depending on how long before 1919 this recipe was added to the repertoire of the Waldorf-Astoria, this may be the oldest recipe for a drink named the ‘Orange Blossom’ that is based on gin and made succulent with orange juice.

Pre-prohibition Drinks of the Week [No. 3]

Pre-prohibition Drinks of the Week [No. 3]

By Andrew “the Alchemist”

Sunday, October 3, 2010

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It’s Sunday, and time for another edition of the Pre-prohibition Drinks of the Week!

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Pre-prohibition Ensemble of the Week:

The GARDEN OF EDEN

Vessel: 2 fl-oz. stemmed cordial goblet

Build in separate layers in the vessel:

→ 1/2 fl-oz. crème Yvette liqueur

→ 1/2 fl-oz. apricot-flavored brandy liqueur {I recommend Marie Brizard™ ‘Apry’}

Enjoy!

From: The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book – by Albert Stevens Crockett (1935)

{This drink is from the main layer of material in Crockett’s book, which he states came from the original recipe book in his possession that had been used in the hotel’s bar until it closed in 1919.}

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Pre-prohibition Sling of the Week:

The (OLD-FASHIONED) INIMITABLE COCKTAIL

Vessel: 5-1/2 fl-oz. (or larger) old-fashioned glass tumbler {chilled}

Build in the tumbler:

→ 1 cube of sugar {standard 1 tsp. size}

→ 1-3 fl-dsh. Peychaud’s aromatic additive bitters

→ 4 drops freshly-pressed Eureka lemon juice

→ ~ 1/4 fl-oz. flat water {or more, depending on taste, or the proof of the spirit}

Muddle until the sugar is dissolved and cocktail water is created

Add:

→ 2 fl-oz. service ice {2 full-ounce cubes}

→ 2 fl-oz. old tom gin

Garnish by twisting a strip of lemon zest over the drink and then dropping it in

Briefly stir the drink in its tumbler

Enjoy!

From: Modern American Drinks – by George Kappeler (1895)

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Pre-prohibition Posset of the Week:

The LALLA ROOKH

Vessel: 5 fl-oz. glass wine goblet {chilled}

Combine in a mixing tin:

→ 1 fl-oz. Cognac brandy

→ 1 fl-oz. pot-still Jamaica rum

→ 3/4 fl-oz. vanilla syrup

→ 1 fl-oz. heavy cream

→ plenty of method ice

Cover with half-tin and shake vigorously to mix, chill, dilute and aerate

Finely-strain into the goblet

Garnish with an authentic maraschino cherry on a skewer

Enjoy!

From: Modern American Drinks – by George Kappeler (1895)

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Pre-prohibition Punch of the Week:

The MIDDLETON

Vessel: 5-1/2 fl-oz. glass sour goblet {chilled}

Combine in a mixing tin:

→ 1-1/3 fl-oz. pot-still Jamaica rum

→ 2/3 fl-oz. genever

→ 1 fl-oz. freshly-pressed Eureka lemon juice

→ 2/3 fl-oz. grenadine {authentic pomegranate syrup – use more, if desired}

→ 1 dsp. egg white {1 dessert-spoon = 2 teaspoons}

→ plenty of method ice

Cover with half-tin and shake vigorously to mix, chill, dilute and aerate

Finely-strain into the goblet

Garnish with an authentic maraschino cherry on a skewer

Enjoy!

From: The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book – by Albert Stevens Crockett (1935)

{This drink is from the main layer of material in Crockett’s book, which he states came from the original recipe book in his possession that had been used in the hotel’s bar until it closed in 1919.}

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Pre-prohibition Grog of the Week:

The BILLY TAYLOR COOLER

Vessel: 13-1/2 fl-oz. tall glass cooler tumbler

→ 5 fl-oz. service ice {5 full-ounce cubes}

Build in the tumbler:

→ 2 fl-oz. dry gin

→ 1/4 fl-oz. freshly-pressed Key lime juice

→ 6 fl-oz. charged water

Insert straw

Garnish with a full-wheel slice of Key lime

Enjoy!

From: Drinks – by Jacques Straub (1914/1948)

Note: many people call this a “Gin Rickey,” but since it also has its own unique, pre-prohibition name, I have chosen to use it.  There is reason to suspect that the original Rickey was based on American rye whiskey.  In 1914 the default lime used in bars in the U.S.A. was the Key lime.  A good, room-temperature Key lime will yield up to 1/3 fl-oz. of juice.  The source indicates the “juice of 1/2 a lime.”  That would be about 1/6 fl-oz., which I have rounded up to the more-easily-measured 1/4 fl-oz.  I recommend using either the juice of half a Key lime or 1/4 fl-oz.

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Pre-prohibition Succulent of the Week:

The EDDY

Vessel: 5 fl-oz. glass wine goblet {chilled}

Combine in a mixing tin:

→ 1 fl-oz. dry gin

→ 1 fl-oz. dry vermouth

→ 1 fl-oz. freshly-pressed orange juice {Valencia or navel}

→ plenty of method ice

Cover with half-tin and shake vigorously to mix, chill, dilute and aerate

Finely-strain into the goblet

Garnish with a quarter-wheel slice of orange

Enjoy!

From: The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book – by Albert Stevens Crockett (1935)

{This drink is from the main layer of material in Crockett’s book, which he states came from the original recipe book in his possession that had been used in the hotel’s bar until it closed in 1919.}

Pre-prohibition Drinks of the Week [No. 2]

Pre-prohibition Drinks of the Week [No. 2]

By Andrew “the Alchemist”

Sunday, September 26, 2010

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It’s Sunday, and time for another edition of the Pre-prohibition Drinks of the Week!

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Pre-prohibition Ensemble of the Week:

The Marble Wall

From: The Bartenders’ Encyclopedia – by Tim Daly (1903)

Service-ware: 4 fl-oz. stemmed glass cordial goblet

Build in the service-ware:

→ 1 fl-oz. American rye whiskey

→ 2 fl-oz. dry white wine

Enjoy!

Note: the old-fashioned gin glass is indicated for this drink, for which the still-available 4 fl-oz. stemmed cordial glass substitutes nicely. The traditional portion for un-mixed spirits is 2 fl-oz., while the traditional portion for wine is 4 fl-oz. – so this drink is a half-portion of the whiskey with a half-portion of the wine.  No garniture is indicated with this drink – but one might prefer to garnish it by twisting a strip of lemon zest over it, and then dropping it in.

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Pre-prohibition Sling of the Week:

The Liberal Cocktail

From: Modern American Drinks – by George Kappeler (1895)

Service-ware: 4½ fl-oz. glass cocktail goblet (chilled)

Combine in a mixing glass:

→ 1 fl-oz. American rye whiskey

→ 1 fl-oz. Torani™ amer (grand bitters)

→ ¼ fl-oz. simple 1:1 sugar syrup

→ method ice

Stir slowly to mix, chill and dilute

Strain into the service-ware

Garnish by twisting a strip of lemon zest over the drink and then dropping it in

Enjoy!

Note: Picon™ Amer is indicated as the bitters in this cocktail.  Picon replaced that product with one of a different formula in the 1970’s. Luckily, Torani produces a grand bitters purportedly-according to the original Picon formula.

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Pre-prohibition Posset of the Week:

The Angel’s Dream

From: The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book – by Albert Stevens Crockett (1935)

This drink is from the main layer of material in Crockett’s book, which he states came from the original recipe book in his possession that had been used in the hotel’s bar until it closed in 1919.

Service-ware: 5 fl-oz. glass wine goblet (chilled)

Combine in a mixing tin:

→ 1 fl-oz. maraschino liqueur

→ 1 fl-oz. crème de violette liqueur

→ 1 fl-oz. heavy cream

→ plenty of method ice

Cover with half-tin and shake vigorously to mix, chill, dilute and aerate

Finely-strain into the service-ware

Garnish with an authentic maraschino cherry on a skewer

Enjoy!

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Pre-prohibition Punch of the Week:

Sangaree (á la 1806)

From: Notes on the West Indies – by George Pinckard (1806)

“Punch and sangaree are commonly taken as the diluents of the morning. The latter forms a most delightful drink. A glass of it, taken when parching of thirst, from heat and fatigue, may be ranked among the highest gratifications of our nature! At such a moment, a draught of sangaree approaches nearer, perhaps, to god-like nectar, than any other known liquor. It consists of half Madeira wine and half water, acidulated with the fragrant lime, sweetened with sugar, and flavored with nutmeg.” (Pinckard, 1806)

Sangaree itself is indicated by the Oxford English Dictionary as being extant as early as 1736, when the Gentleman’s Magazine of London mentions it with the line, “Mr. Gordon, a punch-seller in the Strand, had devised a new punch made of strong Madeira wine and called Sangre.”

By the mid 1800’s, sangaree had found its way to France, where it was called “sangris” and where that name was folk-etymologized as meaning “gray blood.”

It seems even later that the drink travelled to Spain, where it would become known as “sangria” and would eventually be made from any type of wine.

The ‘sangaree’ found in American books of the late 1800’s is a mutation from its original punch form of the 1700’s into an American sling.

Service-ware: 10½ fl-oz. glass punch tumbler

→ 4 fl-oz. service ice (4 full-ounce cubes)

Combine in a mixing tin:

→ 2 fl-oz. verdelho Madeira wine

→ 1 fl-oz. freshly-pressed Key lime juice

→ 1 tbsp. superfine sugar

→ 1½ fl-oz. flat water

→ plenty of method ice

Cover with half-tin and shake vigorously to mix, chill, dilute and aerate

Finely-strain into the service-ware

Insert straw

Garnish with nutmeg grated over the top of the drink

Enjoy!

Note: the source indicates equal parts Madeira wine and water, but I use less water to allow for dilution from method and service ice.  If you cannot find verdelho Madeira, rainwater Madeira will do.

Tip: go have a seat at the bar in Jaraguá at 4493 Beverly boulevard in Los Angeles, and tell the bartender that Andrew suggested the old-time Sangaree.

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Pre-prohibition Grog of the Week:

The Brain Duster

From: Modern American Drinks – by George Kappeler (1895)

Service-ware: 9½ fl-oz. glass highball tumbler (no ice)

Combine in mixing tin:

→ 1 fl-oz. absinthe

→ ½ fl-oz. rye whiskey

→ ½ fl-oz. sweet vermouth

→ ¼ fl-oz. simple 1:1 sugar syrup

→ plenty of method ice

Cover with half-tin and shake vigorously to mix, chill, dilute and aerate

Strain into the service-ware, and then add:

→ 4 fl-oz. charged water (this should not be enough to fill the highball tumbler)

No straw or garniture is necessary, as this drink is meant to be consumed quickly

Enjoy!

Note: the original method seems to have been to stir rather than to shake – but, for this drink, I prefer to shake with plenty of method ice in order to minimize dilution, which is flat, and threatens the charged water that makes up the body of this grog. Also, if a 7 fl-oz. fizz glass is available, it should be used instead, in which the charged water can be added to the fill-point.

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Pre-prohibition Succulent of the Week:

The Monte Carlo

Adapted from: The Bartenders’ Encyclopedia – by Tim Daly (1903)

Service-ware: 5 fl-oz. glass wine goblet (chilled)

Combine in a mixing tin:

→ 1¾ fl-oz. Cognac brandy (or good French brandy)

→ ¼ fl-oz. Bénédictine™ liqueur

→ 1 fl-oz. freshly-pressed orange juice

→ 1 sprig of fresh mint (clapped)

→ plenty of method ice

Cover with half-tin and shake vigorously to mix, chill, dilute and aerate

Finely-strain into the service-ware

Garnish with a quarter-wheel slice of orange

Enjoy!

Pre-prohibition Drinks of the Week

Pre-prohibition Drinks of the Week

By Andrew “the Alchemist”

Sunday, September 19, 2010

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Pre-prohibition Ensemble of the Week:

The Creole Lady

From: The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book – by Albert Stevens Crockett (1935)

This drink is from the main layer of material in Crockett’s book, which he states came from the original recipe book in his possession that had been used in the hotel’s bar until it closed in 1919.

Service-ware: glass spirit snifter

Build in the service-ware:

→ 2 authentic maraschino cherries

→ ½ fl-oz. maraschino liqueur

→ ¾ fl-oz. Bourbon whiskey

→ ¾ fl-oz. verdelho Madeira wine

Stir to mix

Enjoy!

Note: if verdelho Madeira is unavailable, rainwater Madeira may be used.

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Pre-prohibition Sling of the Week:

The Angelus Cocktail

From: The Flowing Bowl – by A. William Schmidt (1892)

Service-ware: 4½ fl-oz. glass cocktail goblet (chilled)

Combine in a mixing glass:

→ 1 fl-oz. tom gin

→ ¼ fl-oz. absinthe

→ ¼ fl-oz. triple-sec Curaçao liqueur

→ ½ fl-oz. sweet vermouth

→ 2 fl-dsh. orange additive bitters

→ method ice

Stir slowly to mix, chill and dilute

Strain into the service-ware

Garnish by twisting a strip of lemon zest over the drink and dropping it in

Enjoy!

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Pre-prohibition Posset of the Week:

The Sabbath Calm

From: The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book – by Albert Stevens Crockett (1935)

This drink is from the main layer of material in Crockett’s book, which he states came from the original recipe book in his possession that had been used in the hotel’s bar until it closed in 1919.

Service-ware: 10½ fl-oz. glass banquet goblet (chilled)

Combine in a mixing tin:

→ 1 fl-oz. Cognac brandy (or good French brandy)

→ 1 fl-oz. ruby Port wine (reserve is preferred)

→ 1 tbsp. superfine sugar

→ ½ fl-oz. espresso coffee (cooled)

→ 1 whole medium raw egg (without the shell)

→ 1 fl-oz. heavy cream

→ plenty of method ice

Cover with half-tin and shake vigorously to mix, chill, dilute and aerate

Finely-strain into the service-ware

Garnish by grating some nutmeg onto the surface of the drink

Enjoy!

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Pre-prohibition Punch of the Week:

The Hancock Sour

Extrapolated from the Hancock Punch

From: Modern American Drinks – by George Kappeler (1895)

Service-ware: 4½ fl-oz. glass sour goblet (chilled)

Combine in a mixing tin:

→ 1½ fl-oz. American rye whiskey

→ ½ fl-oz. traditional rum (pot-distilled from molasses toddy)

→ 1 fl-oz. freshly-pressed Key lime juice

→ 1 tbsp. superfine sugar

→ plenty of method ice

Cover with half-tin and shake vigorously to mix, chill, dilute and aerate

Finely-strain into the service-ware

Garnish with an authentic maraschino cherry on a skewer

Enjoy!

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Pre-prohibition Grog of the Week:

The Marguerite Cooler

(not to be confused with the Marguerite Cocktail)

From: The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book – by Albert Stevens Crockett (1935)

This drink is from the main layer of material in Crockett’s book, which he states came from the original recipe book in his possession that had been used in the hotel’s bar until it closed in 1919.

Service-ware: 14 fl-oz. glass cooler tumbler

→ 5 fl-oz. service ice (5 full-ounce cubes)

Build in service-ware

→ 2 fl-oz. tom gin

→ ½ fl-oz. freshly-pressed Key lime juice

→ 6 fl-oz. cane-sugar ginger ale

Insert a straw

Garnish with a full-wheel slice of Key lime

Enjoy!

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Pre-prohibition Succulent of the Week:

The Cliquet

(a.k.a. Cliquot)

From: Drinks – by Jacques Straub (1914/1948)

This title was originally published in 1914 and reprinted in 1948. The currently available edition appears to be a facsimile reprint of the 1948 edition, which we can only suppose was an accurate reprint of the original 1914 edition.  Straub uses the name ‘Cliquot.’ This drink also appears without garniture as the ‘Cliquet’ in the pre-prohibition material found in The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book by Crockett as published in 1935.

Service-ware: 5 fl-oz. glass wine goblet (chilled)

Combine in a mixing tin:

→ 1¾ fl-oz. American rye whiskey

→ ¼ fl-oz. traditional rum (pot-distilled from molasses toddy)

→ 1 fl-oz. freshly-pressed orange juice

→ plenty of method ice

Cover with half-tin and shake vigorously to mix, chill, dilute and aerate

Finely-strain into the service-ware

Garnish by twisting a strip of lemon zest over the drink and dropping it in

Enjoy!